Tag Archives: solidarity

Solidarity Breaks Chains – against the Democratic co-optation of #Charlottesville

Standard

This is the body of a flyer (PDF: Charlottesville text) distributed at yesterday’s vigil, called by Indivisible Bloomington (a front for the Democratic Party).  The organizers of the vigil hoped to recuperate the tragedy of Heather Heyer’s murder into votes for the Democratic Party.  Much of the crowd openly found this distasteful, leading many to leave early, while others called for a breakaway demonstration towards the end of the evening.

We find this text to be a potent criticism of Indivisible’s craven politicking:

We cannot separate yesterday’s murder from the structure of white-supremacist power in the United States. The police, the judges, the politicians have for the entirety of this nation’s history grounded their political base in the violent suppression and exploitation of people of color. Only now, when it has become politically opportune, have the Democrats and reformers made any effort to express their supposed opposition to alt-right and neo-nazi mobilization. But where was their outrage when the Traditionalist Youth Network was forming itself right here in Bloomington? Where were they when motorists were threatening and on numerous actions attempting to drive through peaceful demonstrations on these very streets?

Refining laws and electing politicians cannot dismantle white supremacy. The way to Honor Heather Heyer is to live as she died, fighting. It’s easier to attend SURJ meetings, finally cut your dreadlocks, and check off your daily call-a-congressman, than to struggle to materially, actually dismantle a centuries-old system of white power. With neo-nazis now openly marching and murdering leftists, let’s not get distracted with individual gestures of allyship, attending vigils to express abstract “solidarity”, or with electing one more Democrat, Republican, or “independent” who professionally pretends to solve the problem for us.

The truth is that the terrorist violence in Charlottesville did not magically appear out of nowhere. Fascists like the neo-nazis marching in Charlottesville, or the back-to-the-land white supremacists down in Paoli (that the Herald Times so enthusiastically promoted), do not appear out of nowhere. They are a paramilitary force, working on the same project of white power as Trump and the Fraternal Order of Police that endorsed him. You don’t have to look as far as Charlottesville to see the violence of white supremacy in action. To be fair, focus is hard. It’s difficult to train your eye on what’s important in life, especially when there are distracting, easy answers at hand.

Politicians and their local “organizer” allies know this, and their game (of thrones) is one of redirection. But if we take the question of fighting white supremacy seriously enough to take the time to refocus, it’s clear that there is plenty of work to be done right here, at our fingertips.

The Bloomington Police Department plays their PR game carefully. But even then, it’s a very thin veil over their classist and racist violence. It’s not a coincidence that the largest anti-racist movement in recent history, the Black Lives Matter movement, focused on dismantling the power of the police. It’s not a coincidence that it was a police officer in an unmarked car who was most recently threatened a peaceful Bloomington demonstration outside the jail (in defense of recently arrested homeless neighbors and friends). The BPD and Monroe County Jail have a recent and decades-old history of violence against people of color and the socio-economically excluded in Bloomington. It’s time to look at the whole system which perpetuates white supremacy, which includes BPD, and fight back.  

Actions in Solidarity with Indiana Prisoners, August 11

Standard

Demonstration in Indianapolis accompanied by solidarity phone zap, from SF Bay View and IDOC Watch.

Demo:  Friday, Aug. 11, 11 a.m., outside the Indiana Department of Corrections headquarters, 302 W. Washington St. in downtown Indianapolis

Phone Zap:  Any time on Friday, call Indiana Department of Corrections Commissioner Rob Carter at (317)233-6984 and demand that he not put into effect the policy banning all incoming mail if it’s not on lined paper and in a white envelope

Call to Action by Kwame ‘Beans’ Shakur, New Afrikan Liberation Collective:

“Prison Lives Matter” and “Amend the 13th: Abolish Legal Slavery in Amerika Movement” are seeking to get the people, i.e., family, friends, inmates and the outside movement, involved in the struggle to raise awareness and fight the cruel and inhuman treatment of prisoners, the daily violations of our human and civil rights, and the economic exploitation of our families. This can only come about if we educate the people to the politics of imprisonment and state repression, then organize and mobilize our families and supporters around these issues.

As we all know, those of us locked in these cages aren’t the only ones being affected – our families and loved ones are also doing time. If we are serious about changing our conditions, then it is fundamental that we take a more progressive stand against the Department of Corrections and the parasite corporations that attach themselves to the prison industrial slave complex to profit from our oppression, including Aramark, Global Tel Link, Evercam, JPay, Union Supply etc.

On April 1, 2017, the Indiana Department of Corrections implemented a new policy that targets our incoming mail: ALL mail must be handwritten on white lined paper in a white envelope. This policy restricts us from receiving any greeting cards on birthdays, Father’s Day, holidays etc., any typed letters or political documents, or any type of drawings from our kids!

Whether it’s simply more convenient, or out of necessity, our elderly family members with medical conditions like arthritis can’t handwrite their letters, and typing is the only way they can send us mail. With the increase of political education material like this very memo coming into the prisons with the intent to educate, agitate and organize prisoners, this new policy is also aimed to eradicate any such efforts.

This is blatant censorship and repression from the state. In their words, they “are going to see how it goes” from April to October before they actually put the policy into effect permanently. If there is no public outcry and resistance from the people on the outside against this policy, then they will have no reason to retreat: Once it goes into effect across the entire state, there will be little we can do.

The powers that are over Pendleton Correctional Facility are slowly attempting to turn this prison into a supermax facility, cutting us off completely from the outside world. Aside from the restriction of incoming mail, those of us like me who are housed on the G Cell House lock up unit (administrative disciplinary segregation) have also been stripped of our phone and video visitation the past 10 months. The policy states that we are entitled to phone privileges at least three times a week.

This cell house is only allowed visitors two days out of the week, Monday and Wednesday. With work and school during the week, it is extremely difficult for our loved ones to travel here during visitation hours. Fortunately, we were able to receive video visits on the JPay kiosk with our loved ones in the comfort of their own homes any day of the week – after work hours until 8 p.m.

However, the lieutenant of this cell house – not the facility or the DOC – recently made it to where we can only receive one 30-minute phone call per week. We can only receive video visits once a week, on the same day and time as our phone call.

We are locked in cages 24 hours a day. The courts and policy have determined that we are entitled to leave these cells for at least an hour of recreation five days a week; however, on average we may get rec once or twice a week, a direct violation of their own policy and procedure.

We have pushed our pens until the ink runs dry and filed the necessary grievances to seek relief. The same individuals who we file our paperwork on are the SAME individuals who respond to our claims, making the entire grievance process ineffective and contradictory.

If the policies and court rulings can be so irrelevant to these people, if the process we are told to follow in order to seek relief and correct such violations is ineffective, then where is the justice? Again, we’re being silenced and censored; we are powerless in these cages against the prison politics of prison autocracy.

Nobody is investigating or calling into question the death of an inmate who was excessively sprayed with multiple cans of mace, shot by pepper balls – a paintball gun that shoots paint balls filled with mace – and then left in a cell untreated to die last year!

For far too long, these people have gotten away with their crimes, without any blowback and resistance from the masses. For far too long, they have gotten away with the exploitation of our families through overpriced phone calls, vending machines in the visit room, JPay fees and commissary.

All across the country, we have formulations and prisoner advocacy organizations assisting us in our struggle to expose the prison industrial slave complex and fight for our rights. It is time that we organize and mobilize right here in our own back yard; our captors must come to learn that there will be consequences for their actions, that they will have to answer and face the people here in Indiana as well.

We are calling on our family, friends and comrades to gather in downtown Indianapolis on Friday, Aug. 11, at 11 a.m. outside the Department of Corrections building, 302 W. Washington St. We urge that ALL of us held captive do our collective part by encouraging loved ones to attend this demonstration and that our loved ones do their part by making copies of this memo, the “Prison Lives Matter” and NALC mission statements, spread the word and push the information for this demonstration on social media.

 Contact us on Facebook at New.Afrikan.Liberation.Collective or email us at NALC_shakur@yahoo.com.

On behalf of the Prison Lives Matter campaign and Amend the 13th: Abolish Legal Slavery in Amerika Movement, One Love, One Struggle!

Kwame “Beans” Shakur, co-founder and chairman of the New Afrikan Liberation Collective

Send our brother some love and light: Michael Joyner (Kwame Shakur), 149677, Pendleton CF, 4490 W. Reformatory Rd., Pendleton IN 46064.

IDOC Watch’s call for a phone zap:

Starting in April, the Indiana Department of Corrections implemented a ban against all incoming mail not written on white lined paper in white envelopes. The ban is a means of political repression and attempt to limit prisoner support, as people can no longer receive documents, articles, cards on the holidays, or drawings from their children.

Call Indiana Department of Corrections Commissioner Rob Carter at (317)233-6984 and demand that the policy restricting any incoming mail not on lined paper and in a white envelope does not go into effect in October and that is harming those who are incarcerated, as well as friends and family on the outside.

Call the commissioner during the rally against the ban happening on Friday, Aug. 11, at 11 a.m outside of the Department of Corrections building at 302 W. Washington St. in Indianapolis.

For background on the history of prisoners’ struggles in Indiana, the imposed PDF for Down can be found here.

Banners Hung For June 11 and Marius Mason

Standard

Reposted from It’s Going Down:

As a small, anonymous gesture of complicity, we hung two banners to honor June 11, day of solidarity with long-term anarchist prisoners. These banners are on the main north/south roads into and out of Bloomington. No matter how long he is held at FMC Carswell or in any other cage, we will make sure Marius isn’t forgotten here, especially given the vital role he played in defending the land and building a community of resistance in our region.

 

 

Graffiti in Memory of Pipeline Resister, James Marker

Standard

Reposted from It’s Going Down:

Last night we tagged a Duke Energy office with words “James Marker, #NoSabalTrail.” This was done in memory of James Leroy Marker, who was killed by Florida police after using a high powered rifle to sabotage the Sabal Trail Pipeline. Duke Energy is heavily invested in this pipeline and is therefore complicit in James Marker’s murder.

This fracked methane pipeline threatens unique ecosystems associated with the Floridan aquifer, including countless rivers, lakes and streams and the associated flora and fauna. Though this was but a small act, it serves as a reminder that pipeline resistance isn’t limited to construction sites or public rallies.

Vengeance for James Leroy Marker! Down with the pipeline and its world!

All out for May Day

Standard


Monday, May 1

Campus Feeder March
Sample Gates starting at 5:30 PM
Bring the migrant strike to IU, confronting the politicians in Indy who passed SB 423, the sanctuary campus ban!  At a time of increasing state racism, we must defend university autonomy against those who would interfere with higher education in the name of discrimination.

Main Demo
Courthouse Square at 6:30 PM

Movimiento Cosecha has organized a call to action for International Labor Day May 1st, for migrant workers and their supporters to refuse to work, go to school, or make purchases on this day. In solidarity with this movement, we are holding a campus rally at Sample Gates, which will culminate in a march to join the greater Bloomington community rally for A Day Without
Immigrants.

Our struggles on campus are not isolated from those of our general
community. In solidarity with the migrant strike, we will not go to work, we will not go to school, and we will not buy.  We must push back against the looming threat of the Muslim ban, cuts to the social wage, and ICE holds in the local jail.

The march from Sample Gates to the courthouse will be accessible. If possible, please wear red or a red bandana all day to show support for the migrant strike!

Movimiento Cosecha :
https://www.facebook.com/events/176782792807762/

Bloomington Immigrants Rights/Derechos Inmigrantes Rally:
https://www.facebook.com/events/1443750852312767/

Printable poster: MayDay11x17

Printable handbills:  MayDay_8x11handbill

No Ban, No Wall – Today

Standard

Reposted from here:

Bloomington Friends: Let’s meet together today, Sunday, January 29, 2017 at 4pm @ the Courthouse Square to support our immigrant and refugee communities of all backgrounds and statuses who are being criminalized, dehumanized, and endangered by the violence of the Trump administration. Please bring your own signs. #NoBanNoWall

New Year’s Eve Banner Drops

Standard

Reposted from Plain Words:

Breaking away from the jail demo tradition, we kicked off the new year with something fresh and exciting. At the stroke of midnight we dropped four banners and let five thousand fliers rain down from two downtown parking garages. United with friends, we reveled in the togetherness we will carry with us into the new year. 2016 was shitty and we expect that 2017 will be as well; however, we recognize the need to continue fighting. With these modest acts, we sharpened coordination practices that we will need in the coming months and years. Each of the banners reflects an element of our revolt we intend to strengthen and spread over the next year – combative memory for our fallen fighters, solidarity with our imprisoned comrades, determination to continue fighting no matter what is thrown at us, and struggle against immediate manifestations of power.

As December ends, we also take time to remember the lives of our fallen warriors. William Avalon Rodgers was an Earth liberationist who took his own life on December 21, 2005 while in jail awaiting trial on arson charges. Kuwasi Balagoon was a former Black Panther, fighter in the Black Liberation Army, bisexual, and anarchist who died in prison from medical neglect due to AIDS-related illness on December 13, 1986.

December 2016 marks 11 years since Avalon’s death and 30 since Kuwasi’s. We will not allow those who sacrificed everything for freedom to be forgotten. As we continue our struggles against Power, we keep alive the memory of Kuwasi, Avalon, Alexandros Grigoropoulos, Sebastián Oversluij, Lambros Foundas, Mauricio Morales, Feral Pines, and all of our other comrades who have passed on. Memory, like fire, burns our enemies and keeps us warm.

We are consistently inspired by Marius Mason’s spirit and take strength from each of his paintings, poems, and letters. In an attempt to return the favor, we also chose to highlight his acts this New Year’s Eve. For many years, Marius lived and took action in Bloomington and we intend to maintain the passion and fighting spirit that he once embodied here.

As a quaint college town and liberal bastion in a red state, Bloomington’s iteration of state violence often takes the form of closing off public space to undesirable populations to maintain a sterile, commerce-friendly environment. One of the primary targets of this cleansing is the sizable homeless population. The city has deployed social worker cops, signs discouraging giving money to people on the street, and several new security cameras in popular hangouts like People’s Park. Despite their language of safety and compassion, we know that the city government has no interest in genuine solutions to the problems of poverty, unaffordable housing, and addiction; in reality, it exists to manage and police the conditions that create these problems. We have made a choice to not fall for the soft policing of the non-profits and charities that are in the pocket of the city.

Whatever 2017 brings, we plan to face it head on.