Tag Archives: ecological

Earth First! Roadshow on May 23rd

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Graffiti in Memory of Pipeline Resister, James Marker

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Reposted from It’s Going Down:

Last night we tagged a Duke Energy office with words “James Marker, #NoSabalTrail.” This was done in memory of James Leroy Marker, who was killed by Florida police after using a high powered rifle to sabotage the Sabal Trail Pipeline. Duke Energy is heavily invested in this pipeline and is therefore complicit in James Marker’s murder.

This fracked methane pipeline threatens unique ecosystems associated with the Floridan aquifer, including countless rivers, lakes and streams and the associated flora and fauna. Though this was but a small act, it serves as a reminder that pipeline resistance isn’t limited to construction sites or public rallies.

Vengeance for James Leroy Marker! Down with the pipeline and its world!

New Year’s Eve Banner Drops

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Reposted from Plain Words:

Breaking away from the jail demo tradition, we kicked off the new year with something fresh and exciting. At the stroke of midnight we dropped four banners and let five thousand fliers rain down from two downtown parking garages. United with friends, we reveled in the togetherness we will carry with us into the new year. 2016 was shitty and we expect that 2017 will be as well; however, we recognize the need to continue fighting. With these modest acts, we sharpened coordination practices that we will need in the coming months and years. Each of the banners reflects an element of our revolt we intend to strengthen and spread over the next year – combative memory for our fallen fighters, solidarity with our imprisoned comrades, determination to continue fighting no matter what is thrown at us, and struggle against immediate manifestations of power.

As December ends, we also take time to remember the lives of our fallen warriors. William Avalon Rodgers was an Earth liberationist who took his own life on December 21, 2005 while in jail awaiting trial on arson charges. Kuwasi Balagoon was a former Black Panther, fighter in the Black Liberation Army, bisexual, and anarchist who died in prison from medical neglect due to AIDS-related illness on December 13, 1986.

December 2016 marks 11 years since Avalon’s death and 30 since Kuwasi’s. We will not allow those who sacrificed everything for freedom to be forgotten. As we continue our struggles against Power, we keep alive the memory of Kuwasi, Avalon, Alexandros Grigoropoulos, Sebastián Oversluij, Lambros Foundas, Mauricio Morales, Feral Pines, and all of our other comrades who have passed on. Memory, like fire, burns our enemies and keeps us warm.

We are consistently inspired by Marius Mason’s spirit and take strength from each of his paintings, poems, and letters. In an attempt to return the favor, we also chose to highlight his acts this New Year’s Eve. For many years, Marius lived and took action in Bloomington and we intend to maintain the passion and fighting spirit that he once embodied here.

As a quaint college town and liberal bastion in a red state, Bloomington’s iteration of state violence often takes the form of closing off public space to undesirable populations to maintain a sterile, commerce-friendly environment. One of the primary targets of this cleansing is the sizable homeless population. The city has deployed social worker cops, signs discouraging giving money to people on the street, and several new security cameras in popular hangouts like People’s Park. Despite their language of safety and compassion, we know that the city government has no interest in genuine solutions to the problems of poverty, unaffordable housing, and addiction; in reality, it exists to manage and police the conditions that create these problems. We have made a choice to not fall for the soft policing of the non-profits and charities that are in the pocket of the city.

Whatever 2017 brings, we plan to face it head on.

Report: Solidarity assembly and action with Standing Rock

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Received and posted:

On Sunday, 30 October 2016, nearly 40 Bloomington community members gathered publicly to build solidarity in resistance to the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL).

DAPL is being built to carry crude oil from North Dakota to Illinois, crossing under the Missouri River and through land that was guaranteed to the Sioux Native American community in the 1851 Fort Laramie Treaty. Pipelines often burst and leak oil into natural water sources; DAPL endangers clean water for nearly 10,000 individuals.

Participants expressed their support of ongoing resistance to DAPL. We shared updates on materials collection and fundraising to support the struggle through the harsh North Dakota winter, while also laying plans for spreading solidarity in the event of further state raids.

The assembly concluded with an action at the Sunoco on south Walnut in response to Sunoco’s hefty investment in the DAPL project, through its parent company Energy Transfer Partners. We picketed the station and blocked one entrance briefly. By demonstrating, we hope to spread awareness of the struggle and the repression at Standing Rock, and make sure that those profiting from the pipeline know that they will face consequences for jailing and injuring water defenders. Resistance will take many forms and spread in the coming weeks, as the construction contractors approach the river and the police ramp up their attacks.

Logging Site Yarned in Brown County

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Reposted from the Earth First! Newswire:
Brown County, Indiana – A logging site on Scarce o’ Fat Ridge in Yellowwood State Forest was the canvas for a recent art installation by Hills O’ Indiana Crochet and Knitting Society. (H.I.C.K.S.)  The group used yarn to weave together dozens of trees marked to be logged.  Dubbed “The Web of Life,” the installation represents the interconnectedness of trees and their central role in the ecosystem.

Creating the installation was apparently a simple task, according to Betty Ayers, vice-president of H.I.C.K.S. “It only really took half an hour,” she said. “In just a short amount of time, we were able to string thousands of yards of yarn between the trees.  It really was something else.”

H.I.C.K.S. encourages other crochet and knitting enthusiasts to take similar actions to help protect the trees and the critters that depend on them from the devastation being wreaked upon Yellowwood and other state forests by the DNR.