Tag Archives: books

Liaisons Magazine Release Party @ Hopscotch 2

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PDF for printing: Liaisons

Poetry / Performance / Discussion
6:30pm
Hopscotch 2
212 N Madison St

In the Name of the People: Reading Global Populism

“In the Name of the People” is the first book by LIAISONS, a collective of authors from America, France, Italy, Japan, Korea, Lebanon, Mexico, Quebec, Russia, Spain, and Ukraine. The book is an analysis and reflection on the global populist surge, written from our experiences within the localities we inhabit. The upheaval and polarizations caused by populist movements around the world indicates above all the urgency to develop global revolutionary perspectives, and to make the necessary
connections to understand and act in the present.

CODY ST. CLAIR is a Ph.D. candidate in the English Department at Indiana University. Their presentation focuses on contemporary housing struggles. Since the 2008 financial crisis, an eviction epidemic has ravaged working and underemployed communities. As the courts prioritize private property rights over living rights and as the privatization of the commons appears limitless, the Left must find traces of the commons—spaces of collectivizing, revolutionary potential—within private, privatized locales. Turning to the 1930s history of spontaneous eviction protests, this talk advocates for a politics that regards all housing—all private, domestic spaces—as publicly and collectively constituted. This history of insurgency against eviction exhorts the current Left to see housing as part of the common, as a fundamentally public concern, and to recognize eviction as a form of violence against the public common.

JANAN ALEXANDRA is a Lebanese-American poet and first-year MFA candidate at Indiana University. She was born in Nicosia, Cyprus and now lives in Bloomington by way of Baltimore, Los Angeles, and Portland, Maine. Her writing is informed by a determined belief in the radical and liberatory work of paying attention—through language & rigorous imagination. Janan is interested in the ways that our linguistic choices are overlaid with geography, ecology, trauma, legacies of colonialism, war and exile. For the last three years she has taught poetry and creative writing to youth, and before that she helped to run the Smith College Poetry Center. She has a BA in African-American Studies and Poetry from Smith College and has published poems in the Adroit Journal and Rusted Radishes, a literary journal coming out of Beirut, Lebanon. Janan believes in the truth-telling power of poems and is keen to disrupt linear narratives, create new language, and make art under capitalism.

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* LIAISONS *
http://www.commonnotions.org/liaisons
https://www.facebook.com/liaisonshq/
https://twitter.com/liaisonshq
https://editionsdivergences.com/produit/liaisons-au-nom-du-peuple/

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New Reading Group on Homelessness and Urban Struggles

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Received and posted:
A few of us are getting together every week to read selections on housing, homelessness, and resistance. We would love to get more people involved, and are hoping to start on the first week of October and read every week for eight weeks (time and place to be determined). The reading list is available here:
<https://docs.google.com/document/d/1rWUSAzoQ1gHG_pIdiVGP-SLrosOgYxTL2QwpMpPw6P4/pub>.
All of the reading materials will be made available online, and we will read in advance of the meeting each week.  It will be less than 100 pages a week, covering topics of housing displacement, urban theory, and homeless resistance. Feel free to participate even if you can’t read every week, or if you only have time to skim. We hope these readings can help further an ongoing conversation about the local politics of housing and homelessness here in Bloomington. If you’re interested, send an email to speermint at gmail.com.

Black Seed Event – May 22nd at Boxcar Books

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Appearing at Boxcar Books (408 e. 6th St, Bloomington, IN) at 7pm on Wednesday May 22nd:

Black Seed is a new, trans-continental, green publication. Its emphasis is on developing a conversation informed by, but critical of, Earth First!, Deep Green Resistance, and Green Anarchy magazine.

Why are we interested in conversation when the world is in such need? Exactly because things are so desperate we believe that face-to-face, personal, and close conversation is needed. The firebrands who have come before, especially in the context of the North American environmental movement, have demonstrated the limitations of crisis thinking. The horrorshow of the petro-economy; of valuing consumer devices over life; and of our utter forgetfulness about the world around us and where we have come from, has to be confronted person-to-person. Another mass culture solution will be absorbed faster than you can say Earth Day.

This discussion will be presenting and fleshing out the editorial of our first issue, discussing the questions of appropriate roles for Anthropology, Spirituality, Rewilding, and what it means to have a respectful outsider relationship to Indigenous communities, culture, and lifeways.

Join us in conversation about our publication and the green power of face-to-face discussion about changing the world.

If you have an interest in these ideas or seeing the books we will be bringing with us from Little Black Cart then come on down and join us for presentation and conversation.

Conflict Infrastructure – LBC is coming to Boxcar October 10th

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Thursday October 10th at 9pm  – join us at Boxcar Books, 408 E. 6th St, in Bloomington

From Aragorn! blog:

LBC Presents – a conversation about Conflict Infrastructure

A speaking tour with a cart full of books!

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In the 1990s the internecine conflict between (North American) anarchists was not red vs green or insurrectionary vs platformist, but those who believed that anarchists should develop infrastructure vs those who believed that anarchists should build a (national) organization. The debates raged but more than that people practiced this difference, something one could do day-to-day. Read the rest of this entry